National Women's History Month - 3 Surprising Things about Annie Oakley

Annie Oakley was one of the first women to learn a sport that was primarily dominated by men, that's not a surprise.

Perhaps you remember learning in history class, it was her shooting skills that made her famous. She toured the United States as the featured performer for Buffalo Bill's Wild West show. As part of a Women's History Month celebration, we're bringing you stories about women who made a difference. Women who weren't afraid to stand out. To this day, Annie Oakley's life and legacy is still a hot topic of discussion. Find out if you know these surprising Annie Oakley facts:

(source: The History Channel)

 

1. ANNIE OAKLEY WAS NOT HER REAL NAME

Oakley was born Phoebe Ann Moses on August 13, 1860, in Darke County, Ohio. Although she became a Wild West folk hero, the sharpshooter spent her entire childhood in the Buckeye State. Called “Annie” by her sisters, she reportedly chose Oakley as her professional last name after the name of an Ohio town near Cincinnati.

2. SHE COMPETED AT WIMBLEDON

True, but she didn't play tennis. The London suburb was better known for hosting England’s biggest shooting event of the summer. While appearing with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee, Oakley took part in the rifle competition in Wimbledon on July 20, 1887. The London Evening News reported Oakley was “far and away” the best shot in the show.

3. SHE CHALLENGED A PROFESSSIONAL SHARPSHOOTER, BEAT HIM, AND ENDED UP MARRYING HIM

A Cincinnati hotel manager arranged a shooting contest between 15-year-old Annie and a professional sharpshooter named Frank Butler. Butler hit 24 out of 25 targets. Annie managed to hit all 25. The two married the following summer and remained together for 50 years. They died within three weeks of each other in 1926.

 

An inspiration to many, Annie wasn't afraid to aim high. Now you know some new Annie Oakley facts.

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