Swipe to the left

May 2017

5 Ways to Stay Safe While Biking

By Jennifer Cassetta 4 months ago 508 Views No comments

by Jennifer Cassetta

According to the Travel Channel, the top ten cities for cycling are: Boulder, Portland, New York City, Washington D.C., Minneapolis, Tucson, Austin, Missoula, San Diego and Louisville. Personally, when I lived in New York City, you couldn’t pay me to get on a bicycle because I was afraid of careless drivers and narrow streets. However, in the past few years, great improvements have been made to make the city and all of these other cities listed, a friendlier place for cyclists.

Now that I live in Los Angeles, I try to use my bicycle as much as I can all year round because the weather permits it. Not only does biking save you dollars at the gas pump, but you are also burning calories while commuting. As if that’s not enough to persuade you to hit the road on a bike, the benefits to the environment are worth it alone. Your carbon footprint will reduce drastically and that’s a benefit to everyone.

Whether you live in a bike friendly city or not, you will need to take safety precautions before and during your ride. In honor of National Bike Safety Month, here are 5 ways to stay safe while biking:

1. Watch out for opening doors.

While riding through the city or town streets next to parked cars, try to keep an eye ahead looking for people in parked cars who may be about to open their doors into traffic. Getting hit by an opening door is NOT fun. Use a bell to alert both drivers and pedestrians that you are coming in hot!

2. Wear a helmet.

Protect your most important asset, your brain! If you are ever struck by a car or knocked off your bike somehow, protecting your brain is vital to your future healing.

3. Carry protection.

You never know when you may find yourself with a flat tire. Or perhaps you’ve taken a wrong turn and wound up in a dodgy neighborhood. It’s always important to carry some form of non-lethal protection, if you are ever threatened by someone up to no good.

The Mace Brand KeyGuard pepper spray carabiner model is great for biking safety because it is easy to latch on to your belt buckle, keys (if they are easily accessible) or even your handle bars. You want to keep it in a place that is out in the open and ready for you to grab and use when needed. To protect yourself against an unruly dog, you can also carry a Mace Brand Muzzle Dog Pepper Spray. Last but not least, depending on your bike tires, you may want to carry an extra tube or a patch kit in case of a flat.

4. Invest in a trusty lock.

I know very few people that live in Los Angeles that have not had a bike stolen from them. A strong bike lock is not the thing to scrimp on. Invest in a good bike lock to reduce bike theft because nobody is happy after seeing their wire lock cut open and bike missing.

5. Be seen at night.

It can be difficult to see a bike at night if you are a driver, especially on roads that are not well lit. Now imagine how much safer you could be if you had blinking lights for cars to spot you. Try having at least one white blinking light on the front of your bike and one red blinking light on the back. I also wear an LED arm band blinking light like this one from Mace Brand, and the Mace Brand Shoe Safety Lights at the same time. You can never be too bright!

Keep Mom Safe and Healthy with These 3 Tips

By Jennifer Cassetta 4 months ago 536 Views No comments

By Jennifer Cassetta

Mace Brand Mother’s Day Blog Post

By Jennifer Cassetta

Keep Mom Safe and Healthy with These 3 Tips

Every day should be Mother’s Day. Moms deserve our appreciation and gratitude for giving us life, guidance and unconditional love. On Sunday, May 14th let’s show our moms that we not only appreciate them but care for their health and safety as well.

Our moms are most likely the ones that taught us certain personal safety basics from a young age. Things like “stranger danger” or simply “don’t talk strangers” are common tips a young mom will teach her kids. Moms can be our greatest protectors while we are young.

As we age, at least for me, the roles begin to reverse and we start to be more concerned for our parents’ personal safety and health.

Depending on where you are in the cycle of life, your mom may be starting to get to an age where she could use some more assistance then she did previously. If that sounds like you, here is a basic checklist of things you could do to keep your mom safe and healthy:

1. Make sure your mom is going for her annual health exams

Many people choose not to go to the doctor unless something is wrong, but it’s important to know vital stats and track them from year to year. Things like getting stats from blood work, blood pressure, resting heart rate, and mammograms (especially if breast cancer runs in the family) are fundamental as we age.

2. Encourage exercise

Support your mom’s exercise routine and if she doesn’t have one, it’s never too late to start. Exercise is going to keep mom’s heart strong, weight managed and bones strong. A balanced exercise routine can also lower blood pressure, lower blood sugar levels and manage stress and anxiety.

If your mom isn’t the type to head out to the gym, there are plenty of great ways to encourage her to exercise at home. Map out a safe route for her to walk everyday to get her heart rate up. Perhaps she can find a neighbor or friend that will join with her for safety and accountability reasons. My mom has a stationary bike and treadmill at home, which are also great ideas for moms that live in colder climates and can’t get outside all year round. For tech savvy moms, a FitBit or other fitness trackers would be a great gift for Mother’s Day to help them track their fitness and reach their goals.

3. Provide personal safety and defense products

Last, but so critical, is thinking of mom’s safety. This is something we think about especially if mom is alone. Safety for single moms or moms that have lost their significant others should be high on our priority list.

I absolutely love the Mace Alert 911 as a gift for mom’s personal safety. It will help her reach emergency services by the press of a button. She can wear the device around her neck while she’s out exercising, shopping or home alone. If anything goes wrong and she feels in danger she can easily access 911, instead of having to find her phone. The Mace Alert 911 will track her by GPS and she will have help in no time. What a relief!

5 Ways to Keep Your Children Safe

By Jennifer Cassetta 5 months ago 514 Views No comments

by Jennifer Cassetta

Whether you live in a big city or small town, it’s important to teach children about their personal safety. There is no perfect age to do this but, in general, the sooner the better. Empowering your young ones with lessons of safety not only makes them safer, it can also have you worry less.

1. Listen to your intuition

Our intuition is our greatest gift when it comes to personal safety for ourselves and for our children. We tend to take our intuition lightly and oftentimes ignore our gut feelings.

Having a gut feeling that something is off about your child’s safety whether at daycare, school or home with a babysitter is a feeling you should always listen to. If you are wrong, no harm is done. If you are right, then you can take action to protect your family. Either way, tune in and investigate your feelings.

2. Talk to your kids

I grew up with a Dad that was an ex-NYPD detective, which meant two things: I didn’t get away with anything and I was taught at an early age to be aware of my personal safety.

It may be challenging to speak to your children about the possible danger that could affect them in the world. We don’t want to scare our children and at the same time we want to make them feel protected and safe. However, it is important to teach kids about “stranger danger” and even danger from people that aren’t strangers. Sadly, many children are harmed by people that they do know, whether that be a family member, caretaker or other member of the community.

Keep an open dialogue and assure your kids that it is safe to confide in you anytime that someone violates their personal space.

3. Teach kids personal space

Personal space can vary between cultures. Generally speaking, here in the U.S. personal space can be defined by holding your arms out to your side and twirling 360 degrees. Anything inside that circle is your personal space. We can teach kids that strangers should not be in their personal space without consent. The same goes for people that are not strangers. Empower your child to set boundaries within their personal space and to communicate when they feel their boundaries have been violated.

4. Add a layer of protection

Before sending your kids off to the bus stop or the playground place an added layer of protection on them by clipping the Mace Brand clip-on personal alarm onto their jacket or backpack. If they ever feel threatened, they can press the alarm to alert bystanders that they may be in danger. The alarm may also deter the attacker. As an added back up, the alarm also acts as a whistle.

5. Take them to martial arts classes

As someone who taught kid’s martial arts classes for years, I can tell you firsthand that the benefits of teaching kids self defense through martial arts are incredible. I saw young, shy children blossom into confident young leaders in the studio that I taught at. Martial arts not only teaches kids how to kick and punch but more importantly, how to stick up for themselves and others. It also helps them with discipline too, which is an added bonus!

3 Things to Know About Sexual Assault Awareness Month

By Jennifer Cassetta 5 months ago 445 Views No comments

By Jennifer Cassetta

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) and it is a great time to raise awareness and help put an end to sexual assault. We no longer need to act like sexual assault is a taboo subject, not to be spoken about. For this month, at least, we can talk, share and support survivors of sexual assault.

According to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC), this year’s SAAM theme is Engaging New Voices and the aim is to engage faith leaders, parents, fraternities and sororities, and community bystanders to help prevent sexual assault by changing the culture and social norms that allow sexual assault to exist.

Here are 3 things everyone should know about sexual assault and how to join the cause to help change the culture and prevent sexual assault from happening:

1. What is it and who is at risk?

Sexual assault is an umbrella term, meaning it is not just one type of sexual act that defines sexual assault. According to the U.S. Justice Department, sexual assault is defined as “any type of sexual contact or behavior that occurs without the explicit consent of the recipient. Falling under the definition of sexual assault are sexual activities as forced sexual intercourse, forcible sodomy, child molestation, incest, fondling, and attempted rape.”

No group of society is safe from sexual assault, although the majority of survivors are women. About one in five women (18.3%) and one in 71 men (1.4%) in the U.S. have been raped at some time in their lives. *

On college campuses specifically, the statistics are even worse. One in four college women will be the victim of a sexual assault and one in 16 men will also.

2. What is rape culture and how do we combat it?

Rape culture is a term that is used to describe an environment in which rape is normalized in a society. There are many examples of rape culture prevalent in our society but in general it is recognized when women’s bodies are objectified, misogynistic language is used and when sexual violence (mostly against women) is glamorized in the media.

To combat rape culture, we can take a stand against people who use misogynistic language. We can stand up to people who dismiss sexual assault as the victim’s fault. We can stop watching or buying media that glamorizes sexual violence against women and certainly not allow our children to consume it either.

For the future, we can teach our younger generation the importance of respectful, healthy relationships and the definition of consent in hopes they will grow up to practice these values.

3. How can we help support survivors?

Being a survivor of sexual assault effects people on a deep emotional and psychological level. Survivors need support from others and professional counseling can be extremely helpful.

Checking in with survivors to make sure they feel supported is important. Also critical is to believe survivors when they share stories and assure them that it is not their fault. Sexual assault happens when assaulters choose to assault and rapists choose to rape, not due to any fault of the survivor. Never question a survivor on why it happened to him or her.

If you are a college student, member of a fraternity or sorority, or a faculty member, you can head to the NSVRC website for campaign ideas and organize an SAAM event this month.

Lastly, if a survivor confides in you, and you are not sure how to support them, you can contact RAINN (www.rainn.org) for advice. RAINN even offers free counseling to survivors.

*All statistics found on the NSVRC.org website.

3 Things to Know About Sexual Assault Awareness Month

By Jennifer Cassetta 5 months ago 445 Views No comments

Sexual Assault Awareness Month

3 Things You Need to Know

By Jennifer Cassetta

3 Things to Know About Sexual Assault Awareness Month

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) and it is a great time to raise awareness and help put an end to sexual assault. We no longer need to act like sexual assault is a taboo subject, not to be spoken about. For this month, at least, we can talk, share and support survivors of sexual assault.

Here are 3 things everyone should know about sexual assault and how to join the cause to help change the culture and prevent sexual assault from happening:

1. What is it and who is at risk?

No group of society is safe from sexual assault, although the majority of survivors are women. About one in five women (18.3%) and one in 71 men (1.4%) in the U.S. have been raped at some time in their lives. *

On college campuses specifically, the statistics are even worse. One in four college women will be the victim of a sexual assault and one in 16 men will also.

2. What is rape culture and how do we combat it?

Rape culture is a term that is used to describe an environment in which rape is normalized in a society. There are many examples of rape culture prevalent in our society but in general it is recognized when women’s bodies are objectified, misogynistic language is used and when sexual violence (mostly against women) is glamorized in the media.

To combat rape culture, we can take a stand against people who use misogynistic language. We can stand up to people who dismiss sexual assault as the victim’s fault. We can stop watching or buying media that glamorizes sexual violence against women and certainly not allow our children to consume it either.

For the future, we can teach our younger generation the importance of respectful, healthy relationships and the definition of consent in hopes they will grow up to practice these values.

3. How can we help support survivors?

Being a survivor of sexual assault effects people on a deep emotional and psychological level. Survivors need support from others and professional counseling can be extremely helpful.

Checking in with survivors to make sure they feel supported is important. Also critical is to believe survivors when they share stories and assure them that it is not their fault. Sexual assault happens when assaulters choose to assault and rapists choose to rape, not due to any fault of the survivor. Never question a survivor on why it happened to him or her.

If you are a college student, member of a fraternity or sorority, or a faculty member, you can head to the NSVRC website for campaign ideas and organize an SAAM event this month.

Lastly, if a survivor confides in you, and you are not sure how to support them, you can contact RAINN (www.rainn.org) for advice. RAINN even offers free counseling to survivors.

*All statistics found on the NSVRC.org website.


SHOP MACE® BRAND FAMILIES

  • exquisite
  • hot-pink
  • key_guard
  • muzzle
  • nitebeams
  • pepper-gard
  • pepper-gun
  • pepper_gel
  • triple_action